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Consumer

Can of C2O Pineapple Coconut Water

Like most coconut water producers, C2O touts its “natural” features and healthy qualities. Its website lists a number of promises: “Plant based,” “Essential Electrolytes,” “Non GMO,” “Never from Concentrate,” and “Single Sourced.” One of its varieties is even labeled “100% Pure.” But are coconut water drinks as healthy and natural as their makers pretend? We’re not entirely sure. Are companies that produce coconut water being completely honest about the ingredients and the health benefits of this drink? We’re investigating their claims.

Large Bottle of Taste Nirvana Coconut Water

Taste Nirvana advertises its “premium” coconuts, “[g]rowing bigger and swe[e]ter than anywhere else in the world,” as well as the “authenticity” of a business run by multiple generations of a family in Thailand. The company’s website says, “Coconut water is very hydrating and contains low calories, no fat, high potassium, and tons of electrolytes.” We’re not entirely sure about the claims being made for coconut water. Are companies being completely honest about the ingredients and the health benefits of this drink? We’re investigating their claims.

Carton of O Organics Coconut Water

O Organics has now become a billion-dollar brand. So says its owner, Albertsons Companies, the supermarket giant that includes Safeway, Vons, Randalls, Star Market, and Shaw’s. The company calls it “one of the nation’s largest brands of USDA-certified organic products.” It now offers coconut water, a popular drink because of its “natural” nature and its association with sports and rapid hydration. It’s a super-healthy drink—right? We’re not sure. Are companies like O Organics that produce coconut water being entirely honest about the ingredients and the health benefits of this drink? We’re investigating their claims.

Container of FOCO Mango Coconut Water

FOCO is at some pains to present its coconut water as a good, healthy, natural product. The product page displays some of its promises: “All Natural,” “Never From Concentrate,” “Single Source,” No Preservatives,” “No Sugar Added,” “Cholesterol & Fat Free.”

This seems like just the thing for today’s consumers: A drink associated with health and exercise, coming from sunny, warm places where people eat and drink what grows naturally. It’s got to be good for you—right? We’re not sure. Are companies that produce coconut water being entirely honest about the ingredients and the health benefits of this drink? We’re investigating their claims.

Can of Goya Coconut Water

“Quench your thirst with naturally hydrating GOYA Coconut Water,” the company webpage invites. “[T]his delicious tropical drink is the clear liquid found when you crack open young coconuts. 100% natural, it’s cholesterol free and low in fat, carbohydrates, and sugar.” Sounds like just what consumers want nowadays. Coming from sunny, tropical places where people eat and drink what grows naturally, it’s got to be good for you—right? We’re not entirely sure. Are companies like Goya that produce coconut water being entirely honest about the ingredients and the health benefits of this drink? 

Letters TCPA with Concentric Circle Design

Insurance companies appear to violate the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA) at a greater rate than many other types of companies. The complaint for this class action brings suit against just such an insurance company, Assurance IQ, LLC, alleging that it sent text messages to consumer cell phones in a manner that violates the TCPA.

Prescription Drugs on Storage Shelves

The Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA) tries to protect consumers from unwanted telemarketing, and among the things it prohibits is the sending of unwanted telemarketing faxes. The complaint for this class action alleges that Canada Prescription Service sent faxes to consumers in violation of the TCPA.

Carton of Pacific Foods Vanilla Almondmilk

Vanilla is a popular flavor, but the demand for it greatly exceeds the supply. Because of this, makers of vanilla-flavored products have come up with various not-all-vanilla solutions, although these are not always properly labeled. The complaint for this class action alleges that Pacific Foods of Oregon, LLC mislabeled its cartons of “vanilla” almondmilk.

Box of Mochi Mochi Vanilla Mochi Ice Cream

The flavor vanilla has different labeling rules than other flavors, although sometimes mislabeling is not subtle. The complaint for this class action alleges that H Mart, Inc. has mislabeled some of its Mochi Mochi brand mochi ice cream products as having “vanilla” ice cream filling, when the flavoring is not genuine vanilla.

Marcus Logo with Robin Hood Hat

Debt collectors must obey the provisions of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA). This complaint brings suit against Goldman Sachs Bank USA as a class action for debt collection attempts that violate the TCPA and individually under the Florida Consumer Collection Practices Act (FCCPA). Goldman Sachs Bank USA is also known as Marcus by Goldman Sachs.

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