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Unfair Services

Cruise Ship

This settles a class action alleging that Marriott did not live up to the promises of its Exchange Program. The complaint alleges that people who booked cruises through International Cruise & Excursion Gallery, Inc. (ICE), Marriott Ownership Resorts, Inc., or Marriott Resorts Travel Company, Inc.

Dish Network Dish

Dish Network will pay out $2.7 million in settlement of a class action brought over its failure to provide Fox Sports Network (FSN) and FX programming over a period of time in October 2010. The class action alleged that the company had breached its contracts with subscribers and therefore owed them refunds. 

One of TSI's New York Sports Club Gyms

It’s understandable that companies aren’t happy about class actions filed against them. Some fight the charges; others change their procedures. But the complaint for this one alleges that Town Sports International (TSI) berated and/or barred two customers who filed one. Both this and the original class action claim that TSI sold “Passport” memberships that purported to offer membership to all of TSI’s gyms, but that members were still denied access to certain locations unless they paid additional fees. This complaint also appears to cite consumer protection statutes in more states.

Staples Store

Nearly $4 million will go to pay people who had Extended Services Plans (also known as Protection Plans) with Staples for the servicing of computers, laptops, netbooks, tablets, digital readers, printers, shredders, digital cameras, and other electronic devices.

Floating on Water

Plaintiff Michael Marko called Reservations.com and booked three hotel rooms in Paducah, Kentucky for December 8-10, 2016. According to the complaint, he gave Reservations.com a payment method and they made the reservation, but he never received a confirmation or receipt. He had no idea, he claims, that he had been charged a $14.99 fee for each of the three rooms he’d booked. Later, when he tried to cancel one of the rooms, he was not permitted to, even though he claims to have fulfilled all the requirements.

Stages of Beauty Product

Stages of Beauty’s website sells skin improvement products designed for specific decades of life and offers to deliver products on a subscription basis as well. However, Plaintiff Matthew Lopez claims that the company does not follow California law regarding the automatic renewal of subscriptions. The laws require the following: Before the consumer clicks the button to agree to a company’s subscription agreement, the company must present the automatic renewal terms in a “clear and conspicuous manner … in visual proximity” to the request for agreement. Before charging a customer’s credit or debit card for an automatic renewal, the company must get the consumer’s affirmative consent. The company must also provide an acknowledgement that contains the terms, the cancellation policy, and information on how to cancel the subscription, in a way that can be retained by the consumer.

iPhone and Uber

Uber has consented to settle a class action alleging that it made misrepresentations or omissions in explaining its Safe Rides Fee and its background check process for drivers.

Debt Collection

According to the complaint for this class action, Plaintiff Patrick Ames stopped by a T-Mobile to compare its prices with his current services plan, only to later find T-Mobile pursuing him to collect the “debt” he owed for services he did not sign up for.

Car Made of Dollars

High interest rates on payday or title loans are sometimes justified by the claim that such loans are made only for short terms. But TitleMax of New Mexico, the complaint alleges, charged plaintiff Jesse Romero high interest rates on a loan that was to amortize over twenty-four monthly payments, so that he would pay $4,056.09 in interest on a loan of only $1,940.44 or be required to pay back $309 for every $100 he borrowed. The complaint alleges that TitleMax misrepresents to borrowers the ease of paying off loans, the chances of repossession, and the cost of the loan, and that in targeting the poor, TitleMax targets its “business practices to those least able to survive them.”

Web.Com Logo

California has detailed regulations about the requirements for automatic subscription renewals or renewals of continuous services, and the complaint for this class action alleges that Web.Com Group violated them, making automatic renewals and charging consumers’ credit or debit cards or accounts without obtaining proper, affirmative consent, and without an acknowledgement that would allow them to cancel easily.

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