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Misclassifying Employees as Independent Contractors

Uber Logo on Smartphone Screen

This settlement resolves two cases brought against Uber Technologies, Inc. claiming that drivers should be classified as employees rather than independent contractors.

Neon Sign at Seventh Veil Club

This settlement resolves a lawsuit brought by a former dancer against 7180 Sunset Blvd., Inc. and Three Group, Inc. under employment laws. The complaint claimed that the companies misclassified dancers, who performed at Seventh Veil, Royal Palace (Star Strip), or Crazy Girls, as independent contractors when they were actually employees.

Three Types of Pepperidge Farm Cookies

The complaint for this class action alleges that Pepperidge Farm, Inc. misclassified the plaintiffs in this action as independent contractors when they were actually employees. Although the rules aren’t hard and fast, the complaint details the ways in which the company had substantial control over the scheduling, policies, and work. It brings suit under Massachusetts laws.

Lift Loading Container onto Truck Bed

Intelliquick is paying more than $5 million to settle a class and collective action alleging that it misclassified drivers and couriers as independent contractors, failing to accurately track their hours and making unlawful deductions from their pay. The complaint alleged that the company owes these employees additional wages or overtime, since they were actually regular employees. 

This class action is another case where a company has classified a worker as an independent contractor rather than an employee. However, in this case plaintiffs Jason Sheldon and Steven Hunsberger had to invest a significant amount of money. The plaintiffs were led to believe that they were starting their own businesses, but the complaint alleges that State Farm controlled nearly everything and provided a great deal of misinformation.

Workers Moving Items at Warehouse

This is a California class action brought against a company for allegedly misclassifying employees as independent contractors, then not paying them overtime and not permitting them to have rest breaks and other things required by law. The defendants this time are Moore Advanced, Inc. and NFI, LP. 

KRH Logo

It seems to be common for companies to misclassify workers as independent contractors to avoid paying overtime and other expenses they’re required to shoulder with regular workers. The complaint for this class action alleges that KRH, Inc. regularly requires some workers to put in more than forty hours per week on the oil and gas wells it services but does not pay them overtime for the work. 

Aboveground Storage Tanks

Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), companies must pay employees overtime for all hours worked over forty each week, unless the workers are exempt from overtime pay under the law. The complaint for this class action alleges that Rockwater Energy Solutions, Inc. paid its oilfield workers a flat day rate and did not pay them overtime if they worked more than forty hours in a given week. It contends that these workers were regular employees and should have been paid overtime at one and a half times their normal hourly rate.

Lowe's Flooring Department

During seventeen years of installing floors for Lowe’s Home Centers, Darin Viars has had neither the freedom of an independent contractor nor the benefits of an employee. The complaint for this class action alleges that Viars has been an employee all along because of the limiting rules and arrangements he has had to follow. A number of factors seem to support the complaint’s claim that he is an employee, and the complaint claims that he has actually been misclassified as an employee, in violation of the Fair Labor Standards Act. 

Female Feet in Very High Heels

This settlement resolves two class actions alleging that dancers performing at certain adult clubs should have been treated as employees rather than owners and so did not receive proper pay and benefits.

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