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Health Insurance

United Behavioral Health Logo

United Behavioral Health (UBH) “administers mental health and substance use disorder benefits for commercial welfare benefit plans,” says the complaint for this class action. But, according to the complaint, UBH’s guidelines for accepting or rejecting treatment under those plans have been flawed and were rejected in a previous class action. This class action seeks to extend the class period for those who want to make claims against UBH.

United HealthCare Sign in Front of Building

This class action, brought against entities in the UnitedHealthcare group of companies, concerns contracts for a Medicare Advantage (MA) insurance plan. The plaintiffs say they are being dropped as providers without being given any reason and that the process violates MA Regulations and the companies’ provider manual.

St. Vincent Infirmary Building

When Nicholas Dorado was injured in an auto accident, he discovered that the facility that treated him did not immediately submit the bills to his insurance company but looked for higher payments than those the insurance company was willing to make. This class action sues St. Vincent Community Health Services, Inc., St. Vincent Infirmary Medical Center, Catholic Health Initiatives Physician Services, LLC, and their insurer First Initiatives Insurance, Ltd. for changing 

UnitedHealth Group Sign with Building in Background

If you are injured in an accident, and the insurer of the driver who was at fault grants you a settlement, can your health insurance simply take some of that settlement, whether or not you’ve been properly reimbursed for your losses? The complaint for this class action claims that UnitedHealth Group, United Healthcare Services, Inc., and other related companies did just that in order to recover some of its costs for treatment of an injured woman.

Sign at Emergency Room

Under California law, insurers must pay reasonable fees to medical providers for emergency services performed on one of their insureds, even if the medical providers are not part of their own networks. California laws also require prompt payment to medical providers. The complaint for this class action claims that Anthem Blue Cross complies with neither of these laws.

Building for QESI

What do you do when you have medical insurance, but the providers refuse to submit the claim to the insurer and instead pursue you for payment, using a debt collection company? Plaintiff Timothy Smith decided to bring this class action, against Qualified Emergency Specialists, Inc. (QESI) and Choice Recovery, Inc.

Breastfeeding Baby

This settlement resolves a class action against CareFirst, Inc., Group Hospitalization and Medical Services, Inc., CareFirst of Maryland, Inc., and CareFirst BlueChoice, Inc. The complaint alleged that health plans of these companies did not properly cover comprehensive lactation support and counseling services (CLS) as required by the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

Building for Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota

If a health insurance company believes it overpaid on previous benefits, can it reduce payments for current, unrelated benefits? The complaint for this class action says it can only if its plan authorizes it. The plan for Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota (BCBSM) does not authorize it, the complaint says, and the reduced benefits paid are a violation of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA). 

Washington Regional Medical Center Building

This class action takes on another practice of the convoluted US healthcare system in which injuries sustained in a car accident may not be paid for by the injured person’s medical insurance. The complaint claims that plaintiff Curtis Randolph was treated at Washington Regional Medical Center (WRMC), a hospital within his insurer’s network, but that the hospital did not go to the insurer for reimbursement but instead pursued Randolph, sought funds from his auto insurer, and filed a lien filed on his potential personal injury recovery from the accident. 

Patient Lying on Gurney, Being Wheeled Through Hospital

Have you been treated at an in-network hospital or emergency room that accepts your insurance, only to receive a surprise bill from out-of-network personnel or services? Have you presented your insurance card, paid your deductible, coinsurance or copayment, and then still received a bill for thousands of dollars that you had no idea you would owe? 

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