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ERISA Violations

Worker in Factory

One of the benefits unions can provide to workers is a retirement plan. However, the complaint for this class action alleges that when workers changed their union representation, the old union refused to roll accounts over to the new one. 

Building for Pioneer Natural Resources

Pioneer Natural Resources USA, Inc. and other parties responsible for the company’s 401(k) plan have agreed to a settlement that claims they have violated the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA). The complaint alleged that the company and other defendants acted improperly, in a way that caused plan participants to pay excessive fees for recordkeeping services.

Fidelity Logo

Participants in 401(k) plans must often pay fees to the mutual funds they invest in. The complaint for this class action alleges that various Fidelity companies required kickbacks from the mutual funds in its retirement plans, which then increased fees or decreased profits for the funds. The complaint claims that these secret payments violate the provisions of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA).

Looking Upward at Tall Building with BB&T Sign

This settlement resolves a class action brought against BB&T Corporation, BB&T Corporation Employee Benefits Plan Committee, BB&T Corporation Board of Directors, Compensation Committee of the Board of Directors of BB&T Corporation, and a long list of individuals.

This class action is another case where a company has classified a worker as an independent contractor rather than an employee. However, in this case plaintiffs Jason Sheldon and Steven Hunsberger had to invest a significant amount of money. The plaintiffs were led to believe that they were starting their own businesses, but the complaint alleges that State Farm controlled nearly everything and provided a great deal of misinformation.

Can of Pepsi

The Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1985 (COBRA) allows employees who are terminated by certain companies to continue their health insurance for a number of months after termination. The complaint for this class action claims that Pepsico, Inc. violated the law in not giving its employees proper information about COBRA. 

Building for Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota

If a health insurance company believes it overpaid on previous benefits, can it reduce payments for current, unrelated benefits? The complaint for this class action says it can only if its plan authorizes it. The plan for Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota (BCBSM) does not authorize it, the complaint says, and the reduced benefits paid are a violation of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA). 

ConAgra Logo

The complaint for this class action notes that certain changes were made to ConAgra Brands Retirement Income Savings Plan in 2015, at the same time as the company laid off around 30% of its workforce. The changes disadvantaged terminated employees, and the complaint claims that ConAgra wanted to save money at their expense. It brings suit under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA).

GE Logo

The complaint for this class action alleges that General Electric put too little aside in reserves for its insurance companies and thereby falsely inflated its earnings and stock price. But this is not a brought by stockholders as a securities case; it’s brought by participants in the GE Retirement Savings Plan under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA).

Folder in File of Folders Marked "Pension"

Plaintiff Robert Koch makes two claims under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA). According to the complaint in the class action he filed, (1) he should have been paid a retroactive benefit or an actuarial increase for retiring years later than the plan’s normal retirement age, and (2) he should not have had his benefits reduced under later amendments to the retirement plan. 

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