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Employment Violations

Charter Communications Sign in Dry Landscape

One violation of labor laws can create a ripple effect of other violations. If an employer has misclassified a worker as exempt (from overtime pay), for example, that may indicate a whole host of other labor requirements that the employer has therefore not observed. The complaint for this class action alleges that Charter Communications, LLC did not properly classify some of its workers under California law and therefore owes them for overtime, missed breaks, waiting time penalties, and other things.

Advocate Health Care Facility

The Advocate Health Care Network has a Disability Income Protection Plan that provides funds for employees who have a long- or short-term disability and are unable to work because of sickness or injury. The plan coordinates its own benefits with benefits paid by other parties, such as Social Security. However, complaint for this class action alleges that the Plan refuses to recognize the common fund doctrine, which allows participants to recover any legal or other expenses they incur in obtaining those benefits. 

View of Crockett's Point Facility in Maine

When a company sells a division of itself, can it simply sign away accrued employee benefits that they will not have with the new owner? The complaint for this class action alleges that when FMC Corporation sold its Health and Nutrition Division to DowDuPont, it allowed employees’ accrued vacation days to simply be wiped out without compensation.

Target Name and Bullseye on Building

This class action is yet another alleging that an employer did not properly calculate or pay overtime for its hourly employees. This time, the employer is Target Corporation. The complaint alleges that the problem is both how the time-and-a-half overtime rate is calculated and the requirement that employees perform off-the-clock duties. It claims violations of both the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) and the Pennsylvania Minimum Wage Act (PMWA). 

Seal of the US Department of Labor

This class action is another set of allegations in the familiar story of companies not keeping proper records and not properly paying employees. In this case, the companies are builders, An Ju Home, Inc., Structure Enterprise, Inc., and Trinity Builders, Inc. Also named as defendants are five individuals who are “bosses” or in other positions of power at the three companies. At issue are the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) and New York Labor Law (NYLL).

Car in Front of Hertz Office: Black-and-White Image with Yellow Details

This class action covers a common complaint in the labor force: the nonpayment of overtime hours because of employee misclassification. The complaint alleges that Hertz Corporation, operating through its Hertz, Dollar, and Thrifty brand car rental agencies, wrongly classified its location managers as exempt employees, thereby avoiding the New York Labor Law (NYLL) that requires overtime pay for additional hours.

Fluffy White Dog Groomed by Petco

It’s difficult enough for workers when wages are low. Unfortunately, the complaint for this class action alleges that Petco Animal Supplies, Inc. also falsified workers’ time records in order to avoid paying them proper overtime. The claims in this class action are brought under the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) and state labor laws.

Duke Energy Truck by Electrical Tower

At some companies, a collective bargaining agreement allows employees to bank their unused sick leave or short-term disability hours, even for years. Should the company later be allowed simply to wipe out those hours, without discussion or compensation? The complaint for this class action alleges that Duke Energy Corporation did just that. It claims violations of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) and the Tennessee Human Rights Act (THRA) along with age discrimination.

Providence's Office Park in Oregon

Providence Health & Services is electing to settle a class action claiming it violated its fiduciary duties with respect to tis 401(a) Service Plan, its Multiple Employer 401(k) Plan, and its 403(b) Value Plan. The complaint alleged that those in charge of the plan made imprudent selection of investment options when there were superior, less expensive options available.

Front of a Walmart Store

Walmart is an extremely large company. As such, it has a lot of clout in making up its own company rules and requiring that employees adhere to them. However, this class action brings suit against Walmart, Inc. and Wal-Mart Associates, Inc. for violations of California’s state labor laws in denying employees accrued vacation time pay when they leave the company.

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