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Employment

Finger Pressing Uber Icon on Cell Phone Screen

The claims raised in this class action, the complaint says, “seek to provide redress to more than 96,000 New York City Uber Drivers … for breaches of contract affecting every member of the largest private sector workforce in New York City…” The class action concerns, first, deductions from Uber driver pay, purportedly for sales taxes and a surcharge for the Black Car Fund (BCF), which provides Workers’ Compensation to drivers. Second, it claims Uber kept two sets of books and charged passengers higher rates than it reported to drivers.

Target Name and Symbol on Store Wall

Employees usually understand when circumstances don’t permit them to take an uninterrupted meal break at certain times. But to prevent them from simply being taken advantage of, the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) requires they be given something else instead: additional pay. The complaint for this class action alleges that Target Corporation does not give all its employees either uninterrupted meal breaks or the extra pay they’re entitled to but subtracts the meal time from their day whether they’ve had the meal or not.

Prudential Insurance Logo

Many employee retirement plans as governed by the Employee Retirement Income Savings Act of 1974 (ERISA). This class action, about the Prudential Employee Savings Plan, alleges that Prudential Insurance Company of America, the plan’s Administrative Committee, and its Investment Oversight Committee chose investment products for the plan that offered advantages to Prudential and its subsidiaries and affiliates at the expense of the participants in the plan.

Goldman Sachs Name on Walls

The Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA) governs various types of employment benefits, including retirement plans. The complaint for this class action alleges that the Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. and the Goldman Sachs 401(k) Plan Retirement Committee “have breached their fiduciary duties and engaged in unlawful self-dealing with respect to the plan…”

Zefco Logo on Window

It’s not unusual to see class actions taking employers to task for improper payment schemes that allow them to underpay workers. This class action takes things farther: It claims that Zefco, Inc. and its operators William and Lanette Zearley had such improper payment schemes that they led to false reporting and the underpayment of taxes to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).

Amazon Delivery Van

Amazon.com, Inc. has now reached $1 trillion in value. It claims to be “customer obsessed” and maintains control over its deliveries in ways other online companies do not. Its delivery channels—Amazon Logistics, Inc. and Amazon.com Services, Inc.—contract with delivery service providers (DSPs) around the country to deliver its packages. But the complaint for this class action alleges that Amazon maintains such extensive control over the DSPs and their drivers when they’re delivering its packages that the drivers are in effect employees of Amazon. It claims that Amazon must observe the provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) in regard to the drivers.

Finger Pressing Uber Icon on Cell Phone

A common issue in labor class actions is the misclassifications of employees as independent contractors when they are really employees. The complaint for this class action brings suit against Uber Technologies, Inc. for a number of labor violations that spring from the alleged misclassification of its drivers as independent contractors. 

Edges of Three Sheets of Corrugated Cardboard, Showing Corrugation

This class action is brought under California labor laws against Georgia-Pacific Corrugated, LLC. The complaint alleges that the company did not properly compensate its non-exempt workers for overtime work, missed meal breaks, and missed rest periods, among other things.

Home Depot Sign on Store Front

Stores of Home Depot USA, Inc. are standard fixtures in many areas of the country, well-known for their orange signs and big-box dimensions. However, the complaint for this class action alleges that the company uses a far less standard way of paying terminated employees their final wages: a debit card.

Target Name and Symbol on Store Wall

This class action concerns employment practices at the California distribution centers of the Target Corporation. The issues are the failure to pay overtime, the failure to provide adequate itemized wage statements, and the failure to pay waiting time penalties, under California labor laws.

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