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Reservations.com Hidden Booking Fee and Inability to Cancel Class Action

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One day last November, plaintiff Michael Marko called Reservations.com and booked three hotel rooms in Paducah, Kentucky for December 8-10, 2016. According to the complaint, he gave Reservations.com a payment method and they made the reservation, but he never received a confirmation or receipt. He had no idea, he claims, that he had been charged a $14.99 fee for each of the three rooms he’d booked. That was the first problem.

The classes for this action are as follows:

All persons and entities in the US who made a reservation through Reservations.com, either by telephone or online, and who were charged a $14.99 booking fee.

All persons and entities in the US who made a reservation through Reservations.com, either by telephone or online, and who were unable to cancel.

Each class has an Illinois subclass.

Later, Marko needed to make changes, the complaint says, so he called the hotel and attempted to cancel one room, but the hotel said he would have to cancel through Reservations.com.

According to the complaint, the Reservations.com website says, “Be sure to review your cancellation policy prior to cancelling your reservation, which was provided on the hotel page as well as your confirmation e-mail.” But Marko claims to have fulfilled all the requirements noted on the hotel page, he claims he never received a confirmation e-mail, and he was not permitted to cancel his reservation.

Marko does not seem to be the only person who’s been surprised by Reservations.com’s business practices. The complaint claims that Sitejabber has over 500 reviews that average 1.3 stars in ratings, and that Trustpilot’s reviews give the company an average of only one star. The complaint quotes a number of reviews of the company that say things like, “Buyer Beware!!!” and “We booked the room for one night for $94. My credit card was charged over $130.” Others also indicate difficulties with cancelling.

The complaint alleges that the company is guilty of breach of contract and breach of good faith and fair dealing, violations of state laws forbidding unfair and deceptive business practices, unjust enrichment, and conversion. 

One day last November, plaintiff Michael Marko called Reservations.com and booked three hotel rooms in Paducah, Kentucky for December 8-10, 2016. According to the complaint, he gave Reservations.com a payment method and they made the reservation, but he never received a confirmation or receipt. He had no idea, he claims, that he had been charged a $14.99 fee for each of the three rooms he’d booked. That was the first problem.

The classes for this action are as follows:

  • All persons and entities in the US who made a reservation through Reservations.com, either by telephone or online, and who were charged a $14.99 booking fee.
  • All persons and entities in the US who made a reservation through Reservations.com, either by telephone or online, and who were unable to cancel.

Each class has an Illinois subclass.

Later, Marko needed to make changes, the complaint says, so he called the hotel and attempted to cancel one room, but the hotel said he would have to cancel through Reservations.com.

According to the complaint, the Reservations.com website says, “Be sure to review your cancellation policy prior to cancelling your reservation, which was provided on the hotel page as well as your confirmation e-mail.” But Marko claims to have fulfilled all the requirements noted on the hotel page, he claims he never received a confirmation e-mail, and he was not permitted to cancel his reservation.

Marko does not seem to be the only person who’s been surprised by Reservations.com’s business practices. The complaint claims that Sitejabber has over 500 reviews that average 1.3 stars in ratings, and that Trustpilot’s reviews give the company an average of only one star. The complaint quotes a number of reviews of the company that say things like, “Buyer Beware!!!” and “We booked the room for one night for $94. My credit card was charged over $130.” Others also indicate difficulties with cancelling.

The complaint alleges that the company is guilty of breach of contract and breach of good faith and fair dealing, violations of state laws forbidding unfair and deceptive business practices, unjust enrichment, and conversion. 

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