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All Natural Claims

Nellie's All Natural Baby Laundry Container

Batten Industries, Inc. labels its kitchen and bathroom cleaners and laundry products as “All Natural,” but the complaint for this class action alleges that they contain synthetic and toxic ingredients. Among other things, the complaint quotes online complaints, including one that says, “Received a chemical burn from wearing clothes washed in this.”

Grisi "Natural" Aloe Vera Soap

Consumers have become concerned about chemicals and synthetics in food, cleaners, and products applied to the skin. Because of this, they are willing to pay higher prices for products that are natural, that is, that contain no synthetic or chemical ingredients. Midway Importing, Inc. claims to produce natural soaps, but according to the complaint, all five types cited contain one or more synthetic ingredients. These include sodium lauryl sulfate (in all five soaps), calcium carbonate, titanium dioxide, and citric acid. 

Salpica Salsa

River North Foods has agreed to settle a class action that alleges that the company misused the word “natural” in marketing and labeling the food products of its Frontera and Salpica brands.

Wahl's Four in One Dog Shampoo

Wahl makes a variety of good-sounding dog products, including shampoos and conditioners, a “deodorant” against dog odor, and cleaning wipes that are useful for paws and muzzles. Prominently located on the front of each product, about a third of the way down the container, is an attention-getting colored seal with the word “Natural” or “100% Natural”.

Credo Beauty Storefront

Eco-Chic sells products at its Credo Beauty website that it advertises are “natural,” “100% natural,” or “100% plant derived”—but are their ingredients truly what the consumer expects from those word? The complaint for this class action claims they’re not.

Honest Company Diapers

The Honest Company, Inc. has agreed to settle a class action against it alleging that it used deceptive marketing and labels to claim that some of its products are “all natural” or “100% natural” when they are not.

Clorox Green Works Products

Many people are willing to pay more for products that seem to be safe because they are advertised as being “natural” or “naturally derived.” However, the complaint for this class action alleges that Clorox’s Green Works line of products should not be marketed with these words without some qualification, as they contain materials that are not natural and that may be allergens or otherwise harmful. According to the complaint, the products contain substances such as boric acid, caprylyl or capryl glucoside, citric acid, d-limonene, dimethicone/silica antifoam, methylisothiazolinone, sodium borate, sodium lauryl sulfate, and unspecified fragrances and artificial dyes. Some of these substances, the complaint claims, are associated with skin irritation, aquatic toxicity, immune system toxicity, and allergic reactions, and are therefore not what consumers believe they will find in products labeled “natural” or “naturally derived.”

Skeeter Snacks Cinnamon Grahams

Skeeter Snacks has agreed to settle a class action alleging that it deceptively advertised and packaged some of its snacks, claiming that they were “all natural” even though they contained artificial or synthetic ingredients such as anhydrous dextrose, lecithin, soy lecithin, and cocoa (processed with alkali).

Olivella Liquid Soap

What could be more “natural” than a face and body liquid soap made from olive oil? Perhaps one without chemicals and preservatives?

Scott Flushable Cleansing Cloths

Because consumers now prefer to buy products with natural, non-synthetic ingredients, the word “natural” can influence choices and even induce consumers to pay more for a product than for a similar but synthetic product. The complaint for this class action alleges that the Kimberly-Clark Corporation advertises its flushable cleansing cloths as “natural” when in reality they contain a number of synthetic ingredients, including sodium chloride, sodium benzoate, phenoxyethanol, malic acid, polysorbate 20, lauryl glucoside, and sorbic acid.

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